When it comes to planning an allotment from scratch, knowledge, effort and a dash of good fortune with the weather are often the necessary components! If you’re looking for a community of like-minded gardeners to help you ace your allotment planning, you’ve come to the right place. 

At Allotment Online, we share tips and tricks, triumphs and tales of challenges that fellow gardeners face to ensure you are well-equipped to deal with your allotment. 

Whether you’re a novice or a seasoned gardener, our community will help you grow, learn and connect with other enthusiasts so you reap maximum benefits of your allotment patch or vegetable garden.  

Sign up to be a part of our community and let’s take your allotment to the next level!

Who Are We? 

Allotment Online started as a passion, shared by a husband and wife duo who started renting their own allotment plot in Northamptonshire. Ever since then, their experience has been rooted in learning through trial and error celebrating the journey along the way.

Allotment Online is a garden community created specifically for garden enthusiasts to share their experiences and knowledge with like-minded gardeners. 

We created this community to connect with other gardening enthusiasts, from beginners to experts, and to share knowledge about growing organic produce. 

Our shared allotment diary page, we want this platform for exchanging advice and experiences and enjoying the journey from garden to table. Our goal is to nurture a community that shares a passion for growing fresh and organic food.

You too can share your experience as part of our Allotment Diary and be a part of this delightful experience as you seek the path towards sustainability. 

Sign up and share your advice today!

Person
04th Mar 2024

The start of 2024 has been a rather grim one for many gardeners with their properties being so waterlogged. As I stand and look out of my kitchen window at the desolation of my garden due to gales and high rainfall, it only makes me more determined to get stuck in at the earliest opportunity and make it better than ever. In truth, my wife and I must admit to being shamefully fair-weather gardeners, we need the sun on our back, stripped to the waist (just me, not the wife, neither a good look) and a glass of vintage cider glinting on the decking table.

It says something for both our resolve, considering the catastrophe’s we have suffered over the years, that our garden is not completely paved over! I will explain: -

 

Catastrophe 1: Last year I constructed a 5-meter-long raised bed for Dahlia’s, a total disaster! Just as they achieved full growth, we realized that as beautiful as they were, the stems were far too short to cut and display without sacrificing many new buds, which would be a shame. Deciding to leave them to bloom in the garden, almost overnight, the entire crop acquired a white powder-like covering on both leaves and flowers and the stems had developed the weirdest twisting contortions. My wife denied using my home-brew cider to promote growth, so the cause remained a mystery. This year we will replace the triffids with Chrysanthemums!

 

Catastrophe 2: At the rear of our pond is a large are of soil supported by log-roll. The entire area was covered in probably a hundred plus of beautiful Hosta’s, which are apparently a ‘McDonalds’ to slugs! Off the shelf slug pellets were of no use as the foliage was far too dense to apply around the base, anyway, the slugs would only trot along the slabbing around the pond perimeter and leap across to my Hosta’s. As a child my ambition or career intention, was to be a ‘mad inventor,’ so slug purging became my new challenge, to invent a no-slug solution.  And a solution it was! I dissolved a whole bag of table salt in a full watering can (to a slug, salt is the equal of 20,000 volts to a human) making a brine solution and showered the entire Hosta area knowing that nomatter how hungry, no slug would touch them from thereon. The following evening, I found every single plant brown, withered and dying fast, eventually to disappear without trace, never to return. On each subsequent visit to garden centers, I swerved any Hosta display for fear of further retribution or injury from the leader of the opposition in public!

 

Catastrophe 3: A friend lent me a huge tub of expensive fertilizer. Preparing the soil of a designated area for runner beans, I mixed the contents into the bed. The runner beans were grown against three trellis topped fencing panels which eventually grew to the length of snooker cues, I chopped, blanched, and froze them all. One evening, a neighbor beckoned me over from his garden and handed me a huge bunch of runner beans that would have taken gold in any large veg growing competition. Thinking he was boasting having grown runner beans akin to railway sleepers, I said "no thanks I already have a freezer full". He said "they are not mine, they are yours, they’re growing through the panels on my side". Good stuff that fertilizer, but the catastrophe was, upon cooking, they were tougher than tree bark and tasted similar. All had to be disposed of and a return to Tesco’s to complete our Sunday dinner. I later learned from my ‘ex’-friend that I should have used a handful “NOT THE WHOLE BLEEDING TUB!” Anyway Spring is springing shortly, time to grab my trug that I bought cheap off the head gardener.

@Kevin
Person
04th Feb 2024

1st beds ready for planting 

@sunnyshaun
Person
03rd Jan 2024

So it’s roughly 3 months since I got the keys. 
it still doesn’t look like much….

but I have - 

  • got a new shed
  • got some tools! 
  • Cleared the bottom that was overgrown and waist high
  • planted onions and garlic as I was so eager!
  • planned where paths and beds are to go
  • got a compost bin on the go

theres still lots to do ready for spring. I continue to dig over the soil and pull up all the weeds. Then cover them with cardboard to suppress new growth. I hope! 

my garlic is doing well. Onions seem a bit slow… fingers crossed. It’s my first growth and I’m very excited every time I see them! 

Fingers crossed this all works and I can get a bit more done before any frosts arrive…. 

@kimmie
Person
11th Dec 2023
@blundy
Person
27th Nov 2023

Today my dad, my son and I went down to make a start on the allotment and it mainly consisted of seeing what we could keep, what needs binning, and what we could reuse.

The old owner had the path come in to the right of the plot before continuing down the middle which I didn't like. I managed to use some of the old fencing to create a fence at the front with a path down the middle. This will allow me to have 6 foot long beds to the left of the 2 foot path, and about 5.5 foot to the right. I haven't measured how long the full plot is yet, so I'm not sure how wide each bed will be. 

My dad pruned the currant bushes and made a start digging over some of the existing beds on the left whilst I made a start digging over the front removing a rotten raised bed which was held together by bind weed! My son created a "bug hotel" out of pots and bits of wood, we will do a better one together I think when we get chance, as he enjoyed playing with the worms and spiders!

Managed to staple some roof felt found in the shed to try and make it a bit more water tight, it's a temporary fix but will hopefully allow it to dry out a bit so we can get some use out of it for a year or two. Got some cardboard down on a particularly weedy patch, eventually I think I'd like to go no dig here, so it may be that we just leave this on this part, or add some more in the future! 

Finished off the visit by planting some tulip bulbs on the left side of the plot along the front fence which Jake, my son, was very much looking forward to and enjoyed. I think it would be nice to try and finish each visit by doing something like that together to keep him interested, although it might not always be possible. 

Won't get chance to head down next weekend, so unsure what we'll get back to, but it's definitely going to take some work and a lot of hours... But will do it in stages, this year focussing on the left side of the plot where the soil looks much better to allow us to get some things planted to grow next year

Ed πŸ˜„

@ed
Person
27th Nov 2023

Date of entry: 18/11/23

Hello, my name is Ed and this is my first time having an allotment! 

To start, I'll tell you a little bit about myself. I live in Cottingham on the outskirts of Hull in East Yorkshire, and that is where my new allotment site is. I have grown up in Cottingham, and over the years my Grandad, my Great Uncle and my Mum and Dad have all had an allotment at some point on the same site, so I have grown up reasonably green fingered! Today, I picked up the key to my very own!

Nothing very productive other than that happened today, other than having an explore and dig in the mud with my 6 year old son and 4 year old nephew. The site has a few beds which have had produce grown in recently (some still there), some large overgrown currant and gooseberry bushes, some raspberries, and a few beds with lots of couch grass in. It also has a small shed with half the roof felt missing at the bottom.

Today was mainly used to find out where to start and I have come away with more questions than answers but...

 

Let the fun begin!

Ed πŸ˜„

@ed
Person
09th Nov 2023

Pleased to have planted by garlic and onions late October before going away for half term! Dodged the rain!

Popped to the plot yesterday to see the garlic are doing really well already! 

The sprouts have taken a bit of a bashing with a bout of whitefly followed by winds but will have to keep an eye on those...

We have a cauliflower head forming! 

Exciting times - even during a gloomy November!

@cazwebs
Person
30th Sep 2023

Such changes to the plot during September! It’s a shame that it mostly marks the end of the growing season but we’ve ordered the garlic and bulbs so plans are already afoot for next year.

We’re munching our way through corn on the cob every day for lunch and have had our fill of beans and courgettes so it’s not the end of the world that they’re coming to an end. I have masses of dried beans for Winter meals and we’ve finally enjoyed some tomatoes, peppers and aubergine.

Now, where are those seed catalogues 😏

@bel
Person
19th Sep 2023
@cazwebs
Person
13th Aug 2023


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Hope you enjoy! πŸ‘πŸπŸŒ±

@davidw
Person
13th Aug 2023

For the last couple of years this old polytunnel frame has been a squash tunnel. This year it’s for beans and the borlotti are loving it - makes for easy picking doesn’t it!

French beans and runners are on there too, but the borlotti are definitely winning at the moment.

@bel
Person
06th Aug 2023

Follow our journey at The Maple Veg Patch 

https://youtube.com/@themaplevegpatch

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1916323112038286/?ref=share_group_link

Cheers

πŸ‘πŸπŸŒ±

@davidw
Person
06th Aug 2023

A few photos from The Maple Veg Patch. 

                               πŸ‘πŸπŸŒ±

@davidw
Person
06th Aug 2023

Our latest vlog at The Maple Veg PatchπŸ‘πŸπŸŒ±


@davidw
Person
04th Aug 2023
@bel
Person
13th Jul 2023
@cazwebs
Person
12th Jul 2023

I had to post about my carrots and how proud I am! For 7 years we have grown or attempted to grow carrots and we have always ended up with carrot fly or very odd-shaped carrots. These Chantenays are perfect! JUst the first few lifted, so fingers crossed the rest are as good!

@cazwebs
Person
11th Jul 2023
@dutchie
Person
10th Jul 2023

Greetings fellow garden enthusiasts and adventure seekers! Today we embark on a hilarious journey to the world of allotment gardening where even the tiniest creatures can bring forth an epic comedy of errors. Picture this: a picturesque allotment garden, the sun shining flowers in bloom, and the sweet scent of freshly grown vegetables lingering in the air. Ah, bliss.

 

But wait, nature has a mischievous surprise in store for us: a wasp's nest. Yes my friends, the buzzing ball of yellow and black fury that strikes fear into the hearts of even the bravest souls. Our protagonist yours truly was in for a wild ride and trust me when I say it was anything but dull.

 

It all began innocently enough. Armed with my gardening gloves hat and a determined spirit I ventured into the allotment to pick my shallots. Little did I know that a menacing swarm of wasps had already made their home amongst them—well more like a wasp equivalent of a condominium.

 

As luck would have it my unsuspecting self stumbled upon this buzzing metropolis. I dropped the shallots and slowing edged away. Trying to stay as still and calm as possible. I stood chatting at a distance I thought was acceptable, they hadn't chased me so I thought I was fine. Little did I know they'd sent out a scout to find me. Suddenly I felt a sharp pain under my arm, then my thumb, looking down at my thumb the black and yellow creature full of vengeance looked back at me. Gasping in horror I swatted the air around me like a deranged windmill performing a rather undignified dance or fright. This soon turned into an Olympic sprinters race running around the allotment trying to escape. Eventually he let me go and I got out of there and went home

 

Now most rational people would have grabbed a can of wasp killer powder and eliminated the threat then and there restoring peace to the garden. Alas dear reader this is not to be. The thought of facing the winged creatures at close quarters again sends shivers down my spine. Images of painful stings and unflattering swelling filled my mind. Oh the indignity of sporting a wasp-induced puffy face anywhere at all. So until I find some bravery deep within myself or I can convince someone else to tackle the winged beasts they will remain in their shallot bed and I will wait until they move or winter takes them. 

Until next time my green-thumbed comrades may your gardens flourish and may the wasps be ever in retreat!

 

Yours hilariously

Becky

@beckysallotmentdiary
Person
08th Jul 2023

One for Daughter, one for Son, one for us..πŸ™‚

@andik
Person
06th Aug 2023

Follow our journey at The Maple Veg Patch 

https://youtube.com/@themaplevegpatch

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1916323112038286/?ref=share_group_link

Cheers

πŸ‘πŸπŸŒ±

@davidw
Person
06th Aug 2023

A few photos from The Maple Veg Patch. 

                               πŸ‘πŸπŸŒ±

@davidw
Person
06th Aug 2023

Our latest vlog at The Maple Veg PatchπŸ‘πŸπŸŒ±


@davidw
Person
04th Aug 2023
@bel
Person
13th Jul 2023
@cazwebs
Person
06th Aug 2023

Follow our journey at The Maple Veg Patch 

https://youtube.com/@themaplevegpatch

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1916323112038286/?ref=share_group_link

Cheers

πŸ‘πŸπŸŒ±

@davidw
Person
06th Aug 2023

A few photos from The Maple Veg Patch. 

                               πŸ‘πŸπŸŒ±

@davidw
Person
06th Aug 2023

Our latest vlog at The Maple Veg PatchπŸ‘πŸπŸŒ±


@davidw
Person
04th Aug 2023
@bel
Person
13th Jul 2023
@cazwebs

Why Be A Part Of Our Online Garden Community? 

When you sign up with Allotment Online, you can easily share your updates and experiences as part of our Live Blog Diaries. This page acts as your own allotment diary, allowing you to share your experiences with fellow gardeners and keep track of your progress. Besides this, here are a few more benefits of joining our online community: 

  • Shared Knowledge: Whether you’re a first-time gardener or a seasoned pro, you’ll find a wide range of gardening tips, tricks and advice from a diverse community of passionate gardeners. 
  • Support and Advice: Our community of like-minded gardening enthusiasts have got answers to your questions, sharing tips and advice, all with an aim to improve your gardening experience. 
  • Inspiration and Ideas: Discover new gardening ideas, share pictures, and upgrade your allotment experience. 
  • Connection and Community: Meet others who share your enthusiasm for gardening. Celebrate your successes, learn from your mistakes and connect with like-minded people.

For More Tips and Advice, Join Allotment Online’s Community! 

At Allotment Online, we’re not just growing plants but also developing a vibrant and supportive community. 

Similar to having an allotment diary, each update or blog tells a story of patience and resilience, indicating the joy that lies in growing your own food. Join our community of garden enthusiasts and share your advice. 

Become a member of our community today and start planning your allotment from scratch with the help of other gardening enthusiasts. Let's nurture our plots and spirits, rain or shine. Embrace the allotment journey – where every season brings new possibilities!

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